Only 5.8% of People Eligible Receive Lung Cancer Screening

Only 5.8% of People Eligible Receive Lung Cancer Screening

The American Lung Association’s 5th annual “State of Lung Cancer” revealed that only 5.8% of the Americans eligible for low-dose CT lung cancer screening had been screened. The US Preventive Services Task Force guidelines recommendations are: Have a 20-pack-year history (1 pack/day for 20 years, 2 packs/day for 10 years) Are a current smoker or…

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Hazardous Attitudes and their Role in Radiology Oncology

Hazardous Attitudes and their Role in Radiology Oncology

A recent study published in the November edition of Advanced in Radiation Oncology, the American Society of Radiation Oncology’s scientific journal, revealed lower levels of hazardous attitudes (HA) in radiology oncologists compared to neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons. The study, led by Nadia Saeed, BA, and Adriana Blakaj, MD, PhD, both of Yale, adapted a method…

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Ethnicity and Race Linked to Delays in Follow-ups for Mammograms

Ethnicity and Race Linked to Delays in Follow-ups for Mammograms

Black, Hispanic, and Asian women are almost one-and-a-half times more likely than white women not to follow-up on mammograms considered incomplete by the BI-RADS scoring system. The BI-RADS scoring system provides radiologists with a shared, standardized terminology to use as they describe and classify their findings. The system gives a score of 0 for exams…

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Bridging the Digital Gap for Breast Cancer Screening

Bridging the Digital Gap for Breast Cancer Screening

While radiologists update their practices with new technology, a study published August 30 in Radiology Business suggests that breast cancer screening locations should continue their non-digital channels — for appointment scheduling, participation in community health programs, as well as maintaining mobile mammography screening in mobile settings close to where patients reside. The study led by…

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Two Studies Show that Expanded Eligibility for Lung Cancer Screening Doesn’t Eliminate Disparities

Two Studies Show that Expanded Eligibility for Lung Cancer Screening Doesn't Eliminate Disparities

  Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s (USPSTF)’s 2021 recommendations for expanded eligibility for low-dose CT lung cancer screenings, two studies revealed that expanded eligibility doesn’t translate into increased utilization of low-dose CT lung cancer screenings among Black adults. A study published September 2 in JAMA Network Open states that increasing eligibility alone is…

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