Lung Abnormalities Continue Even 2 Years After Severe COVID

Lung Abnormalities Continue Even 2 Years After Severe COVID

Two recent studies confirm lung scarring and other abnormalities occur in many COVID patients — even two years later. The studies were conducted at the Margaret Turner Warwick Center for Fibrosing Lung Disease with Iain Stewart, PhD. as corresponding author and at Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University and led by co-senior authors Qing Ye,…

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Potential Pitfalls of Virtual Learning among Radiology Residents

Potential Pitfalls of Virtual Learning among Radiology Residents

Recent studies show that chief residents have doubts about virtual learning and its efficacy in radiology residents’ training. Virtual learning became necessary during the height of the COVID pandemic, and it offers flexibility. However, several studies uncovered a significant pitfall in virtual learning among chief residents. The 2021-2022 Survey of the American Alliance of Academic…

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Cancer Patients Present Imaging Challenges on COVID CT Scans

Cancer Patients Present Imaging Challenges on COVID CT Scans

  CT scans are a critical diagnostic tool for diagnosing COVID pneumonia. Given the number of cancer patients and their susceptibility to infections adds to the overall number of COVID cases. In many emergency departments, cancer patients are likely a substantial portion of any COVID-infected population. However, a recent study revealed that cancer patients face…

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Increased Use of CCTA Cost Effective for Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease

Increased Use of CCTA Cost Effective for Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease

Radiologic screening opportunities are on the increase in the field of cardiology. A new retrospective study examined the results in the United Kingdom of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)’s 2016 recommendation that coronary CT angiography (CCTA) be used as the first-line test for potential angina. Research, led by Jonathan Weir-McCall, PhD…

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Less Movements Just as Effective In Ultrasound for Pancreatic Biopsies

Less Movements Just as Effective In Ultrasound for Pancreatic Biopsies

A new Japanese study shows that fewer to-and-fro movements during an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) are equally effective when performing a pancreatic tumor biopsy. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy published the results in late January. Researchers led by Dr. Kosuke Takahashi of Nagasaki University postulated that far fewer movements are required to acquire the needed sample. The…

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